Voiceless: why millions of Americans won’t be able to vote on November 8

Following months of incessant campaigning by this year’s presidential candidates, registered American voters will make their way to the ballot box this Tuesday to finally decide who will replace outgoing president Barack Obama from next year on. With the race to the White House close and controversial, supporters from both sides of the partisan divide have been urging people to vote since early voting stations started opening … Continue reading Voiceless: why millions of Americans won’t be able to vote on November 8

The battle for Mosul: what happens after?

Two years after Islamic State captured and declared the city of Mosul in northern Iraq part of its expanding caliphate, US-backed Iraqi forces have finally commenced a massive joint offensive to take it back. In their victory, they will strip the militant jihadist group, which has been losing ground across Syria and Iraq for months, of its final major stronghold in the latter country, liberating the city’s besieged … Continue reading The battle for Mosul: what happens after?

Meltdown Venezuela: the current crisis explained

With the world’s highest inflation rate of 180%, widespread lack of food and basic goods, sporadic energy shortages, violent rioting, and ongoing conflict between its political figureheads, its safe to say Venezuela resembles a country in the grip of its final death throes. Just last week, and with the backing of the Supreme Court, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro declared a countrywide 60-day state of emergency … Continue reading Meltdown Venezuela: the current crisis explained

Brussels Attacks: everything we know so far

Today, between approximately 8am and 9am local time, a series of explosions ripped through the Belgium capital of Brussels in what Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel has described as a “cowardly” attack and “black moment” for the nation. This comes days following raids in the neighbourhood of Molenbeek which led to the arrest of Salah Abdeslam, the suspected ringleader behind last November’s terror attacks in Paris, and four … Continue reading Brussels Attacks: everything we know so far

How ‘Spotlight’ gets journalism right

At one point about a third of the way through Tom McCarthy’s Oscar-winning Spotlight, Boston Globe reporter Sasha Pfieffer, portrayed in the film by the ever-brilliant Rachel McAdams, meets with a source at a busy cafe for an interview. Upon seeing Sasha enter, the man stands abruptly to greet her, awkwardly knocking the table as he does so. His name is Joe Crowley and he is one of hundreds … Continue reading How ‘Spotlight’ gets journalism right

Overpriced tuberculosis drug unavailable to countries needing it most: MSF

A promising tuberculosis drug that has had approval for usage for over 2 years and could effectively treat over 300000 newly infected people has only been utilized in 180 cases, according to medical humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). In a statement released last week, the group criticised Japanese pharmaceutical company Otsuka for overpricing its experimental drug delamanid and not doing enough to ensure the most vulnerable have access. Tuberculosis (TB) is one the world’s deadliest … Continue reading Overpriced tuberculosis drug unavailable to countries needing it most: MSF

Tax havens a major contributor to rising inequality: Oxfam

The use of tax havens by hundreds of multinational corporations worldwide is one of the main causes of rising global inequality, according to a recent 44-page report by international not-for-profit Oxfam. Based on research by economist Gabriel Zucman, An Economy for the 1% reveals that corporate tax-dodging costs developing countries at least $100 billion annually. In an opinion piece for Al Jazeera, Oxfam International’s executive director Winnie Byanyima called on … Continue reading Tax havens a major contributor to rising inequality: Oxfam

Double-edged sword: how reporting terrorist violence can aid those that commit it

Coming into 2016, journalists and news organisations working in Pakistan find themselves at the centre of an interesting but increasingly dangerous situation. The Pakistani government has supplied them with a list of 72 outlawed terrorist groups and officially banned reporting on terrorist attacks perpetrated by these groups. This comes as another measure enforced as part of Pakistan’s ever-escalating struggle against terrorism, which kickstarted when extremists murdered 141 people, including 132 children, at a school … Continue reading Double-edged sword: how reporting terrorist violence can aid those that commit it

Threat overblown: there’s too much talk of terrorism in the media

More so than before the tragic events of September 11, 2001, media reporting around the world has become unnervingly inundated with stories concerning terrorism and the groups that perpetrate terrorist violence. In fact, the amount of media coverage given to terrorist activities on a daily basis far outweighs that given to other arguably pressing issues such as climate change and extreme poverty. In the US specifically, terrorism has taken over cable news, with CNN reportedly … Continue reading Threat overblown: there’s too much talk of terrorism in the media

Tensions rising: the South China Sea dispute explained

Saturday’s first-time landing of a Chinese civilian airplane on one of Beijing’s newly constructed island runways in the South China Sea has added more fuel to ongoing tensions about the disputed Indochinese region. The 3000 metre runway, located on Fiery Cross Reef in the Spratly archipelago, is one of three runways China has been building in the area in an attempt to support its expansive ownership claims over … Continue reading Tensions rising: the South China Sea dispute explained